Posted by: Indonesian Children | January 23, 2009

News-Update

News-Update

 

 

CHILDREN ALLERGY UPDATE :

1.      Warning of nut allergy ‘hysteria’. Measures to protect children with nut allergies are becoming increasingly absurd and hysterical, say experts.

2.      Caesarean increases asthma risk . Babies born by Caesarean section are more prone to developing asthma, say Dutch researchers.

3.      LATEX ALLERGY IN NEWS

  1. Baby paracetamol asthma concern. Use of paracetamol in babies increases the risk of developing asthma five years later, a study of more than 200,000 children suggests.

 

 

ALLERGY IN NEWS :

  1. The Wall Street Journal (Oct 2007) When a child is Afraid to eat: Coping with allergy Anxieties
    “In fourth grade, Brentson Duke went grocery shopping with his mom, and when he saw a sign above the aisle that said “peanut butter,” he had a bout of anxiety so severe it set off an asthma attack.
    “I tried to talk him through it and said ‘words won’t hurt,’ ” says his mother, Laura, a day-care administrator outside Nashville, Tenn. But soon after that incident two years ago, Brentson grew so anxious he wouldn’t return to the supermarket, and he begged to skip school. His mom says his pediatrician eventually prescribed Valium to control his frequent panic attacks.
    MORE
  2. Independent.ie Shock Horror: Anaphilaxis (July 2007)
    “Steve Rowland didn’t even have any allergies. Then an anaphylactic attack nearly killed him. Severe reactions like his are on the rise – so what’s causing them?”
    MORE
  3. Earth Times: Asthma factor anaphilaxis (June 2007)
    ” BOSTON, June 15 Asthma is the single most important factor to increase the risk of death from anaphylaxis, or allergic shock, says a U.S. report.
    Anaphylaxis is an allergic reaction affecting the entire body and it ranges from relatively mild to life-threatening.”
    MORE
  4. Medical News Today: AAAAI offers Advice on Stinging Insect Allergies (June 2007)
    “As summer approaches, you may notice an increase in the number of insects buzzing around outside. People with an allergy to stinging insects will want to take extra precautions this time of year. According to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI), up to 5% of Americans are at risk for a severe, potentially life-threatening allergic reaction from insect stings. “For most people, getting stung results in temporary pain, redness and swelling at the site of the sting. However, for those with allergies
  5. BBC News A woman speaks about the lack of care she experienced after being stung by a wasp. (MAY 2007)
    “I was just told to drive to A&E’ Campaigners say patients lives are at risk because health professionals do not know enough about allergies. A woman speaks about the lack of care she experienced after being stung by a wasp. Lucy Parry was getting ready to go to the gym when she was stung by a wasp. Ten minutes later she was passing out in a pharmacy as she pleaded for help. The 28-year-old, from Lincoln, had suffered a severe reaction, known as anaphylactic shock. It had caused her blood pressure to drop alarmingly, but despite struggling to the local chemist for help, she was told she would have to drive to the local hospital for treatment.
    “I got to the nearby pharmacy, but when I asked for something I was told to drive myself to A&E.
    MORE
  6. Toronto Star Label law delay angers activists (May 2007)
    Canadians who suffer from food allergies continue to wait for common-sense food-labelling laws that should have been on the books at least a year ago.Health Canada’s amendments to labelling regulations were made two years ago. All that’s needed before they are put into effect is final comments from interested parties.
    “Some delays have been experienced … due to the complexity of the file and a heavy food-regulatory agenda,” says Health Canada spokesperson Paul Duchesne. He adds that the proposed amendments should be published later this year in the Canada Gazette (the official federal government newspaper), “to seek input from all.”MORE
  7. CTV.ca Study links pregnant peanut eatting to allergies (May 2007)
    “Those late-night pregnancy cravings for peanut butter may not be as innocent as once thought.
    A preliminary study has found links between eating peanuts during pregnancy and an increased risk of peanut and nut allergies in infants.”More
  8. PoughkeepsieJournal.com Parents on Allergy Patrol (May 2007)
    “Hopping atop their wooden footstools, Carter and Zachary Peel wiggle in between their parents, Suzy and Jeff, to place cupcake liners in a baking pan.
    A birthday party is later in the day, and the Scottsdale, Ariz., family, as usual, will take its own snacks.” more
  9. BBC News Peanut Allergy Study Seeks Babies (May 2007)
    “Babies are being sought for a study investigating if early exposure to peanuts will prevent allergy. King’s College London scientists, plus doctors at Guy’s and St Thomas’ hospital, hope to include 480 children in the seven-year study.
    The babies being studied are between four and 11 months and already have eczema or egg allergy, putting them at high risk of being allergic to peanuts.”MORE
  10. Gainesvilletimes.com Hallschools keep life- saving allergy drug on campus (April 2007)
    “In a medical emergency, every minute counts. That’s why every Hall County school has an automated external defibrillator on the premises, in case someone goes into cardiac arrest. And now, the Hall County school system has adopted a program for dealing with anaphylaxis, a life-threatening allergic reaction. “Before this was in place, all we could do was call 911,” said Mamie Coker, health services coordinator for the school system.
    “But some of our North Hall schools have a seven- or eight-minute response time from EMS (the county ambulance service),” Coker said. “And anaphylaxis can happen really fast. Your airway can close up in just a few minutes.” MORE.
  11. Des MoinesRegister.com Waukee school board OKs district-wide allergy policy (April 2007)
    “A hotly debated allergy policy for Waukee schools on Tuesday passed the first of two school board votes needed to enact district-wide safeguards for students allergic to peanuts, pets and other potential allergens.
    The Waukee school board unanimously approved the policy, but left room for minor changes before the policy’s second and final reading May 8.” MORE.
  12. Child.com Allergy Nation Paranoid or PrudentMORE. Pop up ads but worth a read
  13. Food Consumer.org rocessed milk protein may cause eczema (Mar 2007)
    “A study conducted in hopes to show infant formula with hydrolyzed casein results in lower risk of eczema compared to formula with ordinary milk protein indicates that cow milk protein with a large portion of casein may be a cause for eczema. “ MORE
  14. The Wall Street Journal (Oct 2007) When a child is Afraid to eat: Coping with allergy Anxieties
    “In fourth grade, Brentson Duke went grocery shopping with his mom, and when he saw a sign above the aisle that said “peanut butter,” he had a bout of anxiety so severe it set off an asthma attack.
    “I tried to talk him through it and said ‘words won’t hurt,’ ” says his mother, Laura, a day-care administrator outside Nashville, Tenn. But soon after that incident two years ago, Brentson grew so anxious he wouldn’t return to the supermarket, and he begged to skip school. His mom says his pediatrician eventually prescribed Valium to control his frequent panic attacks.MORE
  15. Independent.ie Shock Horror: Anaphilaxis (July 2007)
    “Steve Rowland didn’t even have any allergies. Then an anaphylactic attack nearly killed him. Severe reactions like his are on the rise – so what’s causing them?”MORE
  16. Earth Times: Asthma factor anaphilaxis (June 2007)
    ” BOSTON, June 15 Asthma is the single most important factor to increase the risk of death from anaphylaxis, or allergic shock, says a U.S. report.
    Anaphylaxis is an allergic reaction affecting the entire body and it ranges from relatively mild to life-threatening.”
    MORE
  17. Medical News Today: AAAAI offers Advice on Stinging Insect Allergies (June 2007)
    “As summer approaches, you may notice an increase in the number of insects buzzing around outside. People with an allergy to stinging insects will want to take extra precautions this time of year. According to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI), up to 5% of Americans are at risk for a severe, potentially life-threatening allergic reaction from insect stings. “For most people, getting stung results in temporary pain, redness and swelling at the site of the sting. However, for those with allergies to insect stings, it can result in a sudden, severe reaction called anaphylaxis. This may be fatal if not treated immediately,” said Clifford M. Tepper, MD, FAAAAI. “Symptoms of anaphylaxis to watch for include: itching and hives over large areas of the body, separate or away from the site of the sting; swelling in the throat or tongue; difficulty breathing; dizziness; stomach cramps; nausea and diarrhea. If you suffer from a stinging insect allergy, you should take extra precautions to avoid being stung.” MORE
  18. BBC News A woman speaks about the lack of care she experienced after being stung by a wasp. (MAY 2007)
    “I was just told to drive to A&E’ Campaigners say patients lives are at risk because health professionals do not know enough about allergies. A woman speaks about the lack of care she experienced after being stung by a wasp. Lucy Parry was getting ready to go to the gym when she was stung by a wasp. Ten minutes later she was passing out in a pharmacy as she pleaded for help. The 28-year-old, from Lincoln, had suffered a severe reaction, known as anaphylactic shock. It had caused her blood pressure to drop alarmingly, but despite struggling to the local chemist for help, she was told she would have to drive to the local hospital for treatment.
    “I got to the nearby pharmacy, but when I asked for something I was told to drive myself to A&E.
    MORE
  19. Toronto Star Label law delay angers activists (May 2007)
    Canadians who suffer from food allergies continue to wait for common-sense food-labelling laws that should have been on the books at least a year ago.Health Canada’s amendments to labelling regulations were made two years ago. All that’s needed before they are put into effect is final comments from interested parties.
    “Some delays have been experienced … due to the complexity of the file and a heavy food-regulatory agenda,” says Health Canada spokesperson Paul Duchesne. He adds that the proposed amendments should be published later this year in the Canada Gazette (the official federal government newspaper), “to seek input from all.”MORE
  20. CTV.ca Study links pregnant peanut eatting to allergies (May 2007)
    “Those late-night pregnancy cravings for peanut butter may not be as innocent as once thought.
    A preliminary study has found links between eating peanuts during pregnancy and an increased risk of peanut and nut allergies in infants.” More
  21. PoughkeepsieJournal.com Parents on Allergy Patrol (May 2007)
    “Hopping atop their wooden footstools, Carter and Zachary Peel wiggle in between their parents, Suzy and Jeff, to place cupcake liners in a baking pan.
    A birthday party is later in the day, and the Scottsdale, Ariz., family, as usual, will take its own snacks.” more
  22. BBC News Peanut Allergy Study Seeks Babies (May 2007)
    “Babies are being sought for a study investigating if early exposure to peanuts will prevent allergy. King’s College London scientists, plus doctors at Guy’s and St Thomas’ hospital, hope to include 480 children in the seven-year study.
    The babies being studied are between four and 11 months and already have eczema or egg allergy, putting them at high risk of being allergic to peanuts.”MORE
  23. Gainesvilletimes.com Hallschools keep life- saving allergy drug on campus (April 2007)
    “In a medical emergency, every minute counts. That’s why every Hall County school has an automated external defibrillator on the premises, in case someone goes into cardiac arrest. And now, the Hall County school system has adopted a program for dealing with anaphylaxis, a life-threatening allergic reaction. “Before this was in place, all we could do was call 911,” said Mamie Coker, health services coordinator for the school system.
    “But some of our North Hall schools have a seven- or eight-minute response time from EMS (the county ambulance service),” Coker said. “And anaphylaxis can happen really fast. Your airway can close up in just a few minutes.” MORE.
  24. Des MoinesRegister.com Waukee school board OKs district-wide allergy policy (April 2007)
    “A hotly debated allergy policy for Waukee schools on Tuesday passed the first of two school board votes needed to enact district-wide safeguards for students allergic to peanuts, pets and other potential allergens.
    The Waukee school board unanimously approved the policy, but left room for minor changes before the policy’s second and final reading May 8.” MORE.
  25. Child.com Allergy Nation Paranoid or PrudentMORE. Pop up ads but worth a read
  26. Food Consumer.org rocessed milk protein may cause eczema (Mar 2007)
    “A study conducted in hopes to show infant formula with hydrolyzed casein results in lower risk of eczema compared to formula with ordinary milk protein indicates that cow milk protein with a large portion of casein may be a cause for eczema. “ MORE
  27. The Vancouver Sun: When things go wrong at the pharmacy (March 2007)
    “pharmacist who dispensed a penicillin-type drug to a customer who had just had dental surgery, triggering a severe allergic reaction. The problem occurred because the pharmacy technician assistant who took the order for the prescription failed to document and pass on the allergy information to the pharmacist filling it.” MORE
  28. Legal & Medical:Worker awarded £10,000 for latex allergy (March 2007)
    A man who contracted dermatitis in the workplace has been awarded £10,000 compensation. The 35-year old, who worked for toiletries giant PZ Cussons developed symptoms of dermatitis on his hands and wrists in early 2005. He was later diagnosed with Irritant Contact Dermatitis, attributable to the gloves worn at work at this time.  MORE
  29. Belfast Telegram: Airline’s attitude over nut allergy passenger slammed (March 2007)
    “A budget airline came under fire today after crew on a flight refused to alert passengers about a local woman’s lethal nut allergy.
    Katherine Rea (20) was travelling from Belfast to London with Flybe last Friday and was horrified when crew onboard the plane refused to alert other passengers about her condition.” MORE

 

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CHILDREN ALLERGY CLINIC

Yudhasmara Foundation

Office ; JL Taman Bendungan Asahan 5 Jakarta Indonesia 10210

phone : 62(021) 70081995 – 5703646

email : judarwanto@gmail.com,

http://childrenclinic.wordpress.com/

 

 

 

Copyright © 2009, Children Allergy Clinic  Information Education Network. All rights reserved.

 


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