Posted by: Indonesian Children | May 11, 2010

Symptomatology of Ear-nose-throath (ENT), Chronic cough, Asthma have been linked to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)

 Symptomatology of ear, nose and throath, chronic cough, asthma have been linked to gastroesophageal reflux disease

Widodo Judarwanto

Children Allergy Center – Bunda Jakarta Hospital, Indonesia

Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and its many manifestations are extremely common problems. The pulmonary manifestations are the least well understood and are often unrecognized. Pediatric respiratory diseases such as ear-nose-trhoath infection, chronic cough, asthma have been linked to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), but evidence regarding the association and its potential mechanisms continues to accumulate, and important aspects remain to be determined. The most discussed topics are the relation of GERD and bronchial asthma (BA), chronic cough and The most discussed topics are the relation of GERD and bronchial asthma (BA), chronic cough and symptomatology from ear, nose and throught (ENT) regions, but also non – cardial chest pain and many others from ear, nose and throught (ENT) regions, but also non – cardial chest pain and many others. Evidence for the association in two common pediatric respiratory disorders – infantile apnea and asthma in older children – and difficult clinical issues associated with the diagnosis and treatment of these two disorders are reviewed. The provocative embryological and physiological connections between the upper gastrointestinal tract and the respiratory tract, and recent understanding of the compensatory anatomy and physiology that protect the normal individual from respiratory manifestations of GERD are also explored. Dysfunctions of these protections likely underlie the pathophysiology of these disorders.

Associations have been reported between gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and a variety of upper and lower respiratory tract conditions. Respiratory conditions and GER are common and would be expected to coexist in many patients. Whether there is a relationship between GER and these conditions, its nature still remain controversial, the data available are frequently conflicting and furthermore the direct association between symptoms and reflux is often difficult to establish. For this reason, the majority of clinicians still treat extraesophageal manifestations of GER empirically as esophageal pH testing is not routinely used in the ear, nose and throat (ENT) practice. Purpose of this highlight review is to examine the relationship between GER and these conditions both in adults and children, through a PubMed database systematic review.

Reference

 

Provided by
children’s ALLERGY Center online

JL TAMAN BENDUNGAN ASAHAN 5 JAKARTA PUSAT, JAKARTA INDONESIA 10210

PHONE : (021) 70081995 – 5703646

htpp://www.childrenallergyclinic.wordpress.com/ 

 

Clinical and Editor in Chief :

dr Widodo Judarwanto

email : judarwanto@gmail.com 

 

Information on this web site is provided for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice. You should not use the information on this web site for diagnosing or treating a medical or health condition. You should carefully read all product packaging. If you have or suspect you have a medical problem, promptly contact your professional healthcare provider. 

Copyright © 2010, Children Allergy Center Information Education Network. All rights reserved.


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